Dog Food Recipes: Bow Wow Brunch

Make this easy oatmeal brunch for dogs recipe.
By Roschelle Heuberger PhD, June 2009, Updated July 2021
mango and oatmeal dog food

It is easy to learn how to provide our dogs with nutritious, delicious homemade meals that are reliably safe and made with little or no fuss. You’ll find that dogs love this recipe for homemade dog food oatmeal brunch, and it is easy to make with basic ingredients that you have at home.

Directions for this incredible oatmeal brunch recipe include mixing your oatmeal, some yogurt, cottage cheese, then add in your dog’s favorite fruits. Browse our list of dog-friendly superfoods and fruits to inspire your inner chef.

Go beyond this oatmeal and yogurt brunch with three more dog food recipes that are sure to please your pup’s taste buds and keep them healthy.
Fifi’s Fishy (or Chicky) Affair
Puppy Stew
Fido’s Fricassee

This homemade oatmeal and yogurt recipe for dogs comes from pet nutritionist Roschelle Heuberger, PhD’s article on how to save money with homemade dog food. Learn about the nutritional and financial benefits of feeding your dog home-cooked meals in addition to, or in lieu of, commercial dog food. 

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Homemade Dog Food: Oatmeal Brunch

Home cooking helps you feed ’em well for less.

Ingredients

  • 3 cups cooked oatmeal
  • 2 cups active-culture plain yogurt
  • 2 cups cottage cheese
  • 2 Tbsp. safflower oil
  • 1 banana, peeled and coarsely mashed
  • 1 apple or pear, cored and chopped
  • 1 cup ripe mashed mango

Directions

1. Combine all ingredients in a large bowl and mix thoroughly.

2. Refrigerate, do not freeze.

(Use caution if your pup has not been exposed to dairy.)

Yield: 8 cups, which feeds a medium-sized dog for about 2 days at 4 cups per day.
Serving size: 2 cups
Total cost: approximately $10
Cost per serving: $2.50
Daily cost: $5

Per Serving
Energy: 400 calories
Protein: 26 grams
Carbohydrates: 52 grams
Fat: 12 grams
Omega-3 fatty acids: 0.5 gram
Dietary fiber: 6 grams
Calcium: 324 mg

Important: Many veterinarians, while acknowledging that pet food recalls and the poor quality of some pet foods are causes for concern, still feel that homemade dog food diets, when fed exclusively, may result in nutritional imbalances and vitamin/mineral deficiencies that may pose threats to canine health. Therefore, if you choose to feed your dog homemade dog food, it is important that you understand and provide what your dog needs to stay healthy; veterinary nutritionists can assist in developing suitable homemade diets. While caution was taken to give safe recommendations and accurate instructions in this article, it is impossible to predict an individual dog’s reaction to any food or ingredient. Readers should consult their vets and use personal judgment when applying this information to their own dogs’ diets.

Article first appeared in The Bark, Issue 54: May/Jun 2009

Photo by Joy (Mango) and Christian Schnettelker (Oatmeal) / CC

Roschelle Heuberger, PhD, is a Registered Dietitian, an Associate Professor of Nutrition and director of the Clinical Nutrition graduate program at Central Michigan University.